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Photo by Joe Ruiz via Flickr
Are you taking the day off? This dude is; as part of the tradition of labor and rest, Labor Day is the one day each year when the Hammering Man statue stands still. 
Also, if you’ve never read the artists’ statement about the Hammering Man by artist Jonathan Borofsky, you should do that today.
“The Hammering Man is a worker. The Hammering Man celebrates the worker. He or she is the village craftsman, the South African coal miner, the computer operator, the farmer or the aerospace worker-the people who produce the commodities on which we depend…I want this work to communicate to all the people of Seattle-not just the artists, but families, young and old. I would hope that children who see theHammering Man at work would connect their delight with the potential mysteries that a museum could offer them in their future.
At its heart, society reveres the worker. The Hammering Man is the worker in all of us.”
Read the whole thing here (the statement appears to be with citation because, after quite an internet rabbit hole exploration, it seems to have originally been hosted on the SAM website but, after a makeover, was never reinstated, which is kind of a shame) and think about what a huge year it’s been for the laborers here at home and how much more there is to come.
Happy Labor Day, all. 

Photo by Joe Ruiz via Flickr

Are you taking the day off? This dude is; as part of the tradition of labor and rest, Labor Day is the one day each year when the Hammering Man statue stands still. 

Also, if you’ve never read the artists’ statement about the Hammering Man by artist Jonathan Borofsky, you should do that today.

The Hammering Man is a worker. The Hammering Man celebrates the worker. He or she is the village craftsman, the South African coal miner, the computer operator, the farmer or the aerospace worker-the people who produce the commodities on which we depend…I want this work to communicate to all the people of Seattle-not just the artists, but families, young and old. I would hope that children who see theHammering Man at work would connect their delight with the potential mysteries that a museum could offer them in their future.

At its heart, society reveres the worker. The Hammering Man is the worker in all of us.”

Read the whole thing here (the statement appears to be with citation because, after quite an internet rabbit hole exploration, it seems to have originally been hosted on the SAM website but, after a makeover, was never reinstated, which is kind of a shame) and think about what a huge year it’s been for the laborers here at home and how much more there is to come.

Happy Labor Day, all. 

And yet we still see our family members harassed by police, we still hear and read racist comments, we still watch efforts to dismantle our families and livelihoods under the guise of “civilizing” us, still see efforts to destroy our homelands and watch the law find ways to take even our children. We live in a world where there are people who won’t acknowledge us unless they are trying to convince us our culture exists only to be appropriated. Do we deserve such treatment? No. And yet here we are.

Alex-jon Earl reflects on the fourth anniversary of the shooting of John T. Williams by SPD officer Ian Birk — and the continued struggle of Seattle’s native population — over on The Urbanist. Read it.

Erm…the Weekly’s Bumbershoot preview for La Luz is real weird

So, the Seattle Weekly has, like most other publications in town, assembled a list of bands to see at Bumbershoot. But one of their writers — a dude named Peter Muller who we tried to Google and had no luck because he does not appear to write very much other stuff/be a person with a social media presence — seems to have gone sort of rogue with his description of beloved local surf rock group La Luz.

In an alternate universe, the members of La Luz have adopted me from the pound. I wear a collar and do silly tricks that make them giggle. In return I get to sit on their laps and sniff their butts. La Luz, I wanna be your dog. Fountain Lawn Stage, Mon., 12:30 p.m. —Peter Muller”

Yup. Lest ye think it’s just the tone of the roundup, though, here’s a look at the other previews in the issue:

Notice something? Oh yeah, they all actually describe the band’s music and not, you know, their butts.

And not only is this little gem online, it’s in print, which apparently did not bode super well with one of the members of the band. Lena Simon, who performs with the band and has a pretty dope solo project called KAIROS, shared an image of the review in print to her Instagram with the caption “this is despicable.” She later deleted it.

The Weekly has a history of doing things that are maybe supposed to be humorous but kind of land flat, so maybe this is…a joke?

But it’s hard not to see this as actually pretty shitty because a.) it’s not hard to write a real review of this band. La Luz is amazing and have a really interesting story and a really different cool sound and all of the women in the band have played around town in a bunch of different bands, and b.) it sucks shit to be a woman in music and female musicians already get the short end of the music coverage stick, so it’s real bogus to see potentially important ink get wasted on this crap.

Come on, Seattle Weekly. We know festival season is hard but like…try harder.

Fremont bridge painting: Definitely what we need right now

The city is advising people to “spend more time in Fremont,” ostensibly because it will be damn near impossible to get out. That’s because the Fremont bridge is going to be painted, which will force closures and also generally muck things up. The painting will start week and be completed in…

…wait for it…


…FEBRUARY. During off-peak hours, lanes and the walkway will be closed. Pedestrians and cyclists and drivers (so, everyone) “should allow for additional crossing time due to congestion.

Also, says the City, “the bridge will also open more frequently until painting is completed, as more vessels will require the bridge to open to pass underneath,” because “the painter’s scaffolding and containment system beneath the bridge reduces the vertical clearance above the surface of the Ship Canal.”

"As a result, traffic back-ups resulting from openings of the bridge will occur more often. Drivers are encouraged to use alternative routes if convenient.

Yikes. Everyone stay safe out there and, I guess, take 99 or some other route.

Chop Suey will probably be OK

Everyone is buzzing about the Zillow listing for Chop Suey (the business, but not the actual building), but Zach Wise, the marketing guy there (friend of the site) says not to worry. Here’s what he told us:

The bar has actually been for sale by the current owners for nearly 3 years. The most recent development is that they’ve dropped the asking price, and the listing has been made public. There hasn’t been any changing of hands yet, it’s all still hypothetical.

While I’m not at liberty to discuss the management’s meetings with prospective buyers, I will say that it’s definitely possible that someone in the music community who cares about what we’re doing will buy the spot and keep our current format.

In the meantime, Jodi, our talent buyer, is still putting together some of the most diverse and exciting shows in Seattle, and I have no plans to stop promoting them. I understand the community’s concern, but if all goes well Chop Suey will be around for a long time.

We’ll keep you posted on this as more happens/if anyone buys it.

A woman was struck and killed at 2nd and University this morning

A cyclist was struck and killed by a left-turning box truck on 2nd and University, per the SPD Blotter.

This Ish Ed has used the 2nd Avenue bike lanes frequently, and can say that I am always terrified this is going to happen, since the lane brings you right into the path of a left-turning vehicle that totally doesn’t see you pretty much every time. This is why bikes don’t use those bike lanes, dudes, so next time you see a cyclist outside of a bike lane, before you comment on a local news article about that one time you saw a bike doing something that did not make sense to you, consider the safety concerns that may have led to that decision. Usually, the answer is, “I feared for my safety,” not, “I wanted to slow down that guy in the left lane because BICYCLE RIGHTS.”

Also, you know, consider the inherent humanity of every human being before you take to local news comment threads and demand banning all bikes from downtown or going on about how you see cyclists run red lights sometimes. Because, no. Stop.

Seriously, reading news comments right now is like:

image

The City had already planned to address safety concerns with the 2nd Ave bike lanes, installing a two-way bikeway east of the parking lanes — similar to the Broadway Bikeway — which I hope prevents at least some of these incidents in the future. SDOT specifically cites getting bikes out of the “door zone” and reducing “conflicts of left-turning vehicles and people walking and biking” as benefits of their design. They’ll be installing the protected lane September 5-7.

R.I.P., unnamed cyclist. We’ll be thinking about you.

Cataldo is the only band you need to learn about this year as a Seattle music fan.

…Maybe also Cumulus but seriously Eric Anderson is what’s up. 

And hey! Let us know what you see at Bshoot this year. We’ll have one embedded ed there with eyes and ears on it, but, you know, tell us what you love. We like to know. 

Q13: Shockingly real on Reddit

Q13 clearly has someone who knows a thing or two working for them on the community/social front, because they got real real on a thread about bedbugs on r/Seattle. Behold:

a.) Admitting that ratings drive scare stories = something literally everyone knows but news outlets never admit to

b.) Explaining their FOX affiliation, which is interesting.

So far they’ve only left these three comments, but it seems to be working; the user has 139 comment karma points, and other Redditors seemed pretty down with these upfront answers. 

Game recognize game, Q13.